Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Laya's first ride

Soon after my wife and I began dating, I asked her if she'd be interested in going out for a ride on my motorcycle. She had never been on a bike before. She decided she'd give it a try. I told her I'd start out slowly and on local roads. If she didn't like it, we could quickly head back for the barn. I showed her how to put on a motorcycle helmet, and where the footpegs were. I also made sure she knew that the motorcycle turns by leaning. When I leaned to the left, she needed to lean with me. Some people get very nervous, and lean the other way. This can actually cause the motorcycle to go straight!!

She was doing just fine on the local roads, so I kicked it up a little bit, and headed west, towards the mountains. After about an hour, we stopped at a gas station to have a bite to eat and to stretch out. I took a look at my tailpipe... what was that on there? Melted rubber?? "Ummm, Laya, did your foot feel warm at all?" Yep, turns out she didn't realize her foot wasn't on the peg. Instead, it was on the tailpipe. So her brand new shoes then looked like this:




(She still uses these shoes today!)

After leaving the gas station, we continued on to the Shenandoah Mountains, going up Rt. 211 to Skyline Drive. This stretch of 211 is a biker's dream, heading up the mountain, very twisty, left, right, left, right... Wow!!! But as soon as we got onto Skyline Drive (located just before 211 started going downhill) I could feel Laya's head bobbling around a little bit. I pulled into the first rest area, which also was a picnic area. Oh wow, I guess the road got a little bit too twisty... Laya was dizzy. We stayed there for about 45 minutes or so, resting, letting Laya get her balance back, and eating some pre-packed sandwiches.

The speed limit on Skyline Drive is only 35 mph, so even though it was twisty, it wasn't enough to get Laya dizzy again. Plus I took my riding back down a notch. After exiting Skyline Drive, we continued heading back to my place. About half way before we got back, we pulled into another gas station, and got some ice cream and again sat down to relax and talk. (While I have done 1,000 mile days, this was Laya's first time on a bike, so I didn't want to push it by any means!)

While we were talking, I congratulated her on her first motorcycle ride, and had a gift for her to remember it by. I knew that she loves to collect key chains (I didn't know how much so until after we were married, and I helped to move buckets of them into our new home!) So I got her a keychain with Popeye and Olive Oyl riding on a motorcycle together. (all together now... aaawwwwwww...)

From there, we rode on to a gathering of motorcyclists in the DC area at a bar near my office (shooting pool, kicking tires, etc.) After all that was done, we arrived back at my place. It was a long ride, and she did a great job on it! Now, with the two kids underfoot, it's hard to get away for a ride together. Hopefully some day this summer will find a nice day where someone can take the kids for a few hours, and get out for another ride somewhere. Or actually, now that they are at camp some days, I might even take a morning off of work. The mountains keep calling...

Oh, and it only took about 2 hours to scrape off all of the dried up rubber from the tailpipe. :-) At least she never did that again!

9 comments:

Mordechai Y. Scher said...

That was great! The keychain bit is definately mushy!

My wife has ridden on the back of our Honda a few times, but doesn't like it without a backrest of some sort (which I don't have). We just purchased an '01 Sprint ST. We'll have to see how likes two-up on it. I have to locate a backrest for it. I don't know if there is one for the stock seat...

I hope you guys get out again soon. Ride safe, now.

Jewish Deaf Motorcycling Dad said...

With my current bike, a '98 Concours, the backrest is provided by a Givi "topcase" bag with a pad attached to it. My previous (first) bike was a Honda Nighthawk 700 SC. I called a few of the big salvage yards and found a combo backrest/luggage rack made by KG (which was no longer in business, even back in '95 when I got this).

The really neat thing about the backrest was that it had two thumbscrews. If I was riding solo, I could easily move the rest up so it would provide ME support. Then with a passenger, I'd just slide it back, and it would provide my passenger support. It was really nifty.

Best of luck with the Sprint ST. Have you checked out any Triumph forums? I find that if I post a question on the Concours forum, I'm given an answer (or 2, or 5, or...) within minutes. A day at the most.

Mordechai Y. Scher said...

I brought the Triumph home tonight. The garage is a little crowded with three bikes. ;-) It's already taken me to shul once, so we're off to a good start!

One of the moderators of our Honda forum (SOHC4) is active on a Triumph forum. I joined it and another one, and have (like you) already gotten some quick responses.

The Sprint has a bit more forward posture since it *is* a sport-tourer, so I'm learning to stay off of my wrists. That's the price I pay for wanting to stay lightweight.

Jewish Deaf Motorcycling Dad said...

I had the same problem when I first got my Concours. I bought a set of Gen-Mar handle bar raisers. They added about an inch in height, and made a *huge* difference in my wrists and back comfort.

Ah, garage... must be nice. Laya and I have already discussed our house when we move in the next few years. For me: A garage; for her: A large kitchen.

Mordechai Y. Scher said...

This bike already has GenMars on it. GenMar (a NM company) told me I could add another set on top of them, but there really isn't clearance under the fairing at full-lock. I'm going to give it a few weeks to see how I learn to sit better. Even on the ride home last night on the interstate, I could see how much just depends on my posture.

Garage is great! That's what allowed me to redo the electrics and rebuild the carbs on my Honda over the winter. 'Course, I might have been better off learning gemara instead of working on my transportation. :-)

Jewish Deaf Motorcycling Dad said...

'Course, I might have been better off learning gemara instead of working on my transportation. :-)

True, but if you are stuck on the side of the road at night in the rain because your carbs weren't rebuilt...

Mordechai Y. Scher said...

Funny you should say that...

I *have* been stuck in the NM sun, learning mishnayot by the side of the road while awaiting a tow after throwing my chain at high speed.

Mordechai Y. Scher said...

Oh, and I threw the chain (most likely) because I had neglected properly maintaining it...

Hong said...

Cool!